The Curious Correspondence Club – Chapter VI: Milton Manor (Review)

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Players:  We recommend 1-4

Price: $19.95 Monthly, $179.00 Yearly

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Theme:

What started as a simple museum visit has become a international adventure! Chapter VI of The Curious Correspondence Club takes us to the stately Milton Manor for more puzzling solving, intrigue, and brilliant paper craft! Like all good mansions, this one is full of secrets, and is sure to make for a thrilling spot for this month’s caper!

First Impressions:

There’s not much to say I haven’t said before about this amazing subscription. I’m consistently excited to receive the next chapter, and this one is no exception! Upon opening the envelope, I was very excited to see how a particular paper craft prop would work, as well as how these disparate pieces to the puzzle would fit together.

High Points:

Chapter VI felt like a fresh new experience, but at the same time, contained vibes reminiscent of Chapter I, encouraging us to visit a collection of different rooms in a non-linear fashion in order to draw out all the mansion’s secrets before presenting us with a brilliant meta puzzle to tie everything together! Each room contained an intuitive puzzle that required us to think outside the box and make connections between the other props and rooms. The puzzles were excellently designed, and presented a moderate level of difficulty that provided a balance between smoothly flowing fun and brain busting challenge! All of the enigmas included were multi layered, and I really love how The Curious Correspondence Club consistently ensures that every single puzzle they create is original and full of ah ha moments. There hasn’t been one puzzle which I’ve felt “been there done that” about, and I know that I can rely on the designers to create something new and mind blowing every single month! I really loved the presentation of the decoding puzzles in this chapter, and it is really cool how these instances can be solved in multiple ways, allowing for all types of thinkers to be involved.

One of the major props was amazingly designed, and I really loved interacting with it. It was also the focus of a lot of the puzzles, but managed to feel interesting each time, and we were always excited to return to it. A lot of the puzzles rely on more indirect clues, so a keen eye is required, but the information is not so hidden that it feels unfair. This allows for players to arrive at some immensely satisfying conclusions, revealing the solve organically. One prop in particular wasn’t used by us until later, and once we realized its significance, we were blown away by how satisfying it was to solve the clue. This chapter felt to me like the most dense of the six so far, and is easily my favorite run of puzzles overall. From the non linear set up, to the astounding props, as well as some of the most intriguing conundrums yet, I absolutely adored the experience!

Low Points:

Some of the fonts can be a little difficult to decipher. Generally, Curious Correspondence games help with immersion by including “hand written” fonts where applicable, but there’s always a line between authenticity and readability that unfortunately gets crossed a bit too far from readability for this one.

Verdict:

Chapter VI of The Curious Correspondence Club deserves all the praise it can get, as it serves up a run of puzzles that are excellently challenging, but are still accessible enough that newcomers can solve them with some thinking. I really adore this subscription, and cannot wait for Chapter VII to arrive! I highly recommend subscribing, and you can join The Curious Correspondence Club here!

9.5/10 (Excellent)

Full Disclosure: The Curious Correspondence Club provided a complementary envelope.

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